Editor’s Note: Freshman at Don Bosco Cristo Rey High School, Cayla Dolet spends her Wednesdays as an intern at FMS. Cayla has been working on creative projects to engage her artistic talents with the mission of FMS. This is a reflection Cayla wrote based off her drawings inspired by the Easter season.

As a young child, it is easy to overlook the complicated procedures that you don’t understand yet. I know when I was younger, I would only be motivated by the amount of Easter eggs and candy I would receive on Easter, instead of caring or being involved in the true celebration of Easter. It took me a while to understand the meaning of the symbols included in the holiday and that all those years of Easter egg hunts signify something crucial. For instance, the Easter egg is a symbol for the resurrection of Christ, rebirth, and fertility. And in some churches, Easter eggs are dyed red to embody the blood of Jesus Christ. After learning this, I decided to take that new information I had just learned, research more on the topic, and incorporate the Easter symbols into my drawings. Both drawings convey the idea that although traditions may be different, they share the same meaning and are equally significant because of that.  Both drawings incorporate the many symbols of Easter, revealing the true sense of the resurrection without the use of words. The butterflies emerging from a cocoon represent eternal life, the cross for the crucifixion, the vines for the blood and flesh of Jesus, the thorns for the crown he wore during his crucifixion, the lamb to represent Jesus, the “Lamb of God”, palm branches to represent goodness, well-being, and to remind us of the time when Jesus first arrived in Jerusalem, the “tongue like flame” on the middle cross to remember the moment at Pentecost, and lastly, the Easter lilies that symbolizes purity and honesty.